3:50 pm - 6:30 pm
W Parsons T 6 East 16th Street 734 Jan 24, 2017 - May 9, 2017
 

Parsons The New School for Design
School of Art, Media & Technology, Photography Program
Terry Towery Part Time Associate Teaching Professor
Toweryt@newschool.edu Office hours by appointment only

 

Course Description:

This course is an introduction to the relevant critical frameworks within contemporary photography as reflected in the program’s five pathways: contemporary art, creative industry, fashion culture, imaging technology and social engagement. Structured to increase students’ knowledge and confidence in relating to contemporary concepts of photography, students are encouraged to develop their independent photographic practices through readings, presentations and visual and writing assignments. The central aim of this course is to develop students’ skills in presenting and writing about their own practices as part of a constantly evolving definition of photography.

Materials and Supplies
Access to a DSLR style camera or better
Printing materials eg photo grade paper
Thumb Drive dedicated to this course

Course Readings and Materials
Readings are listed in the course outline

Open to: Majors Only
Credits: 3
Pre­requisite: Core Studio 1
Co­requisite: Core Studio 2
Required course: Sophomore, Spring semester Max enrollment: 15
 
 

Learning Outcomes:

The assignments for this course are aimed to develop students’ skills in researching and discussing contemporary ideas about photography. Students will be expected to read and digest the weekly texts in order to be able to participate fully in class discussions. Students should expect also to research and regularly give short presentations on key figures and ideas relating to photography. By the final weeks of the course, they will have researched, presented and properly edited a short written paper that elucidates the relationship between their own creative practices with the course’s particular notion of photography. Time for discussing and developing the final text will be allocated throughout the course. The aims of Photo Topics are to enable students to:

  1. Develop an understanding of key contemporary ideas about photography through reading, field trips and class discussions

  2. Articulate a knowledge of contemporary critical dialogue about photography through presentations, discussions and writing

  3. Demonstrate an ability to present and discuss work in relation to the broad scope of photographic ideas that are currently at play while identifying and articulating specific ambitions for photographic practice.

Useful links: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2014/01/lighting-101-to-go.html
Photograph mag
Petapixel
Aipad report https://aipad.site-ym.com
American Suburb X
The Well made Photograph AD Coleman

 
 

Final Grade Calculation

Students’ ability to meet the course’s learning outcomes will be evaluated based on the following criteria:
Participation in group discussions, field trips, demonstrations, critiques and collaborations. Engagement in the coursework and development of work ethic.
Completion of assignments to specification as described in the syllabus.
Demonstration of an increasing fluency with contemporary lens-based technical processes.
The ability to merge technique and content in lens based images produced for weekly and long term assignments.
Demonstrated proficiency in fundamental digital photographic processes as shown by the student’s ability to shoot, process and output lens-based work
Engagement in the coursework and development of work ethic
Participation in group discussions, field trips, demonstrations, critiques and collaborations
Attendance can influence a grade adversely due to any pattern of absence or lateness.

Final Grade Calculation:
Attendance 0% Come to class or Fail
Reading and participation in class discussions 25%
Assignments and Projects 50%
Final Project 25%
Total 100%

Assignments:
1.  What you make or find ­ bring to class an aspect of your own practice or an aspect of photographic culture that interests for group discussion.  Present a map of your interests and what you care about right now
2. Your own block
3. zine project
4. Presentations
5. A social media project
6. Each student to present a concept and content of a contemporary art photography group exhibition
7. Final Project
8. CD/DVD of ALL work produced in the class

 
Course Outline
week
Topic Assignment Due Reading

1

1/24

Weeks 1 &­ 2: Photography’s Broad Terrain

Weeks 1 and 2 are dedicated to creating an overview of the key ideas of the Photo Topics course. The principal components will be lecture by the class instructor and class discussion focused on the reading.

Lecture discussion Uses and Abuses of photography

Assignment Suggestions:

  • ●  What you make or find ­
    bring to class an aspect of your own practice or an aspect of photographic culture that interests for group discussion.

    ●  Present a map of your interests and what you care about right now

 

A.D. Coleman
The Well made photograph Part 7

Optional:

Julian Stallabrass, ‘Sixty Billion Sunsets’, Gargantua, p 13­39

Photography is NOT magic

2

1/31

Discuss reading

Look at maps

  Map of your interests  

3

2/7

Weeks 3 & ­4: Photography as Social Practice AKA Concerned photography AKA photojournalism AKA Do-Gooder art AKA Privilege illustrated

Weeks 3 and 4 concentrate on the "enduring" capacity of photography to activate positive social change. We consider the roles that photographers take in the scope of contemporary social practice from long­term documenters of human lives to facilitators, collaborators and participators within socially engaged creative practices.

Suggested Photographers to discuss: Bruce Davidson, Malcom Shabazz, Wendy Ewald, J.R., Zoe Strauss, Susan Meiselas, Mark Strandquist, Pete Brook, Gemma­Rose Turnbull, Eliza Gregory, Emily Jacir

Eirini Vourloumis, Brian McCarty's War Toy project, Annabel Clark, Jesse Hlebo,

Assignment:

Your own block

 

Pablo Helguera, Education for Socially Engaged Art (all)

On Looking excerpts

Winogrand Interview

4

2/14

Discuss reading

Look at On your own Block assignment

  Your own block  

5

2/21

Weeks 5 & ­6: Photography as Fashion Culture

Weeks 5 and 6 focus on fashion image­making. We survey the history of photography’s engagement with fashion and style and also the current scope of fashion photography as a creative industry. We discuss the implications of using of sexuality to sell clothes.

Suggested Photographers to discuss:
Supreme Court Definition of Porn, Bruce Weber, Patrick Demarchelier, Steven Klein, Steven Meisel, Corinne Day, Juergen Teller, David Sims, Mario Sorrenti, Craig McDean, Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin, Alasdair Mclellan, Tyrone Lebon, Mert & Marcus

Parsons/New School Grads and faculty: Therese & Joel, Gentl & Hyers, Mary Rozzi, Martina Hoogland Ivanow, Jean Cabuncan, Barbara Bodrnick, Corrine Schiavone, Jon Grassi, Toby Kaufmann,

Alexei Brodovich and here of Harpers Bazaar Magazine and his coterie, Avedon, Penn, Lillian Bassman,

"Astonish me!"

Group zine project:
You are to make at least a 4 page spread for a "zine", it should include a "cover" image and at least a 3 page editorial spread about a topic of your choice. It must be on 8.5 x 11 luster paper in portrait orientation and printed for spiral binding.

http://www.magcloud.com/products/print

http://www.magcloud.com/products/formats

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTlmho_RovY

 

Online readings/viewings:
Yolanda Dominguez

Banned Calvin Klein ad

FASHION OR PORN? The Hypersexulalization of OF WESTERN CULTURE AND THE COMMODIFICATION OF SEX

Vogue Italia editor admits 'fashion is one of the causes' of anorexia in Harvard speech about body image

Reality Show Sends Fashion Bloggers to Work in Cambodian Sweatshop

6

2/28

Discuss reading

Look at Fashion projects

Presentations:
Each participant in Photo Topics will give a ten ­minute presentation on their own practice and its broader photographic context. Students are expected to include the work of individual photographers and photographic ideas that inspire their photographic practice.
Zine Spread  

7

3/7

Week 7: Presentations

Each participant in Photo Topics will give a ten ­minute presentation on their own practice and its broader photographic context. Students are expected to include the work of individual photographers and photographic ideas that inspire their photographic practice.

  Presentations  

8

3/14

Weeks 8­ & 9: Photography as Creative Industry

Weeks 8 and 9 engage with the creative industries of photography with a special emphasis on the state of play in editorial photography, advertising, photography festivals and fairs, and photography publishing.

Suggested examples to discuss:
AIPAD, Paris Photo and Paris PhotoLA, Printed Matter Art Book Fair, Rencontre D’Arles, Sony Photo Awards, Mack Books, Blurb.com, Kickstarter.com

Relevant Parsons grads: Anne Senstadt, Mary Mattingly, Alex Thebez, Jesse Hlebo,

 

Assignment/ Activity Suggestion: ● Field trip or art fair

AIPAD, MOMA modern photo,

 

Reading:
Fred Ritchin, ‘The Useful Photographer’, Bending the Frame, p 8­26

Marvin Heiferman, Photography Changes Everything, (selected essays)

Hans Abbing, ‘Economic Value Versus Aesthetic Value’, Why Are Artists Poor?, p 52­76

3/21 Spring Break no Class

Spring Break no Class
9 3/28 Discuss readings      

10

4/4

Weeks 10­ & 11: Photography as Technologies

Weeks 10 and 11 focus on identifying what technologies create the scope of contemporary photography and how they determine the nature of our photographic practices. We consider how both analogue and digital technologies are part of contemporary photographic practices and bring photography’s rich heritage and its exciting future into play.

Examples to discuss: Takeshi Murata, Eva and Franco Mattes, Corey Arcangel, Michael Bell­Smith, Lorna Mills, Gregg Leuch, Jeremiah Johnson, Jeremy Rotsztain, Tabor Robak, Ryder Ripps, Michael Manning, Rollin Leonard, Joel Holmberg, assume vivid astrofocus, Siegren Versteeg, Jason Salovan, Casey Reas, John Houck

The McCoys, Packet Sniffing, Blaise Aguilera, Snapdragon, Physical computing,

Suggested Assignment:
● A social media project

selfie city

Yochai Benkler, ‘Introduction: A Moment of Opportunity and Challenge’, The Wealth of Networks, p 1­35

Lev Manovich, ‘Inside Photoshop’, Software Takes Command, p 124­157

11

4/11

Discuss reading      

12

4/18

Week 12: field trip, workshop, or discussion to supplement previous weeks.

AIPAD, MOMA modern photo,    

13

4/25

Weeks 13­ & 14: Photography as Contemporary Art

Weeks 13 and 14 focuses on the prevalent ideas at play within contemporary art photography. We consider especially the material forms of photography created specifically for the art gallery context, researching and thinking about contemporary practitioners who are continuing to innovate the scope of photography as art.

  • Suggested Photographers to discuss: Lucas Blalock, Kate Steciw, Joshua Citarella, Daniel Shea, Roe Ethridge, Elad Lassry, Mariah Robertson, Matthew Brandt, Rinko Kawauchi, Torbjorn Rodland, Oliver Chanarin & Adam Broomberg, Shannon Ebner, Carter Mull, Jason Fulford, Daniel Gordon

     

  • Each student to present a concept and content of a contemporary art photography group exhibition

    ●  Each student to present a plan of their final text submission for class critique

 

Michael KImmelman
The Art of Collecting Lightbulbs

 

Richard Sennett, ‘Prologue’, and ‘Ability’, The Craftsman, p 1­15, p 268­285

Equivalence, The Perennial Trend

14

5/2

Discuss readings      

15

5/9

Week 15: Presentations and final text submission

In the final week of this course, participants present their final text that contextualizes their own practices in the scope of contemporary photography. You will preesnt a poperly researched, presented and properly edited a short written paper that elucidates the relationship between your own creative practices with the course’s particular notion of photography.

Acknowledging that this is a studio art course, In lieu of a paper you may instead choose to do a creative project.

Student Work Documentation
Students are required to submit digital copies of all semester work to their instructor before the end of the term.

I will expect a CD or DVD of ALL of your semester course work and assignments.

   
         
 

Grading and Evaluation (how you are graded) AKA assessment jargon

Students’ ability to meet the course’s learning outcomes will be evaluated based on the following criteria:
Additional criteria that may impact a student’s grade can be added here.

1. Demonstrate an increasing understanding of the historical, cultural, social, political and conceptual themes of photography through the application of research, reading and discussion.

  1. Engagement in the coursework and development of work ethic

  2. Attendance

  3. Completion of assignments to specification as described in the syllabus or assignment sheet

  4. Participation in group discussions, field trips, demonstrations, critiques and collaborations

Assessable Tasks

Assessable Tasks are activities, assignments, projects that satisfy the course's learning outcomes.
To be entered by faculty. This is a summary of the types of tasks that are linked to the learning outcomes.

Critique of F

fashion photography's impact on culture

Explore the relationship between concerned photogrpahy and social change.

Explore the meaning of being an artist outside of the petty demands of the marketplace.

 

   

Resources
The university provides many resources to help students achieve academic and artistic excellence. These resources include:
The University (and associated) Libraries: http://library.newschool.edu
The University Learning Center: http://www.newschool.edu/learning-center
University Disabilities Services: http://www.newschool.edu/student-services/student-disability-services . In keeping with the university’s policy of providing equal access for students with disabilities, any student with a disability who needs academic accommodations is welcome to meet with me privately. All conversations will be kept confidential. Students requesting any accommodations will also need to contact Student Disability Service (SDS). SDS will conduct an intake and, if appropriate, the Director will provide an academic accommodation notification letter for you to bring to me. At that point, I will review the letter with you and discuss these accommodations in relation to this course.

Assessable Tasks
Assessable Tasks are activities, assignments, projects that satisfy the course’s learning outcomes.

Divisional, Program and Class Policies

Responsibility
Students are responsible for all assignments, even if they are absent.  Late assignments, failure to complete the assignments for class discussion and/or critique, and lack of preparedness for in-class discussions, presentations and/or critiques will jeopardize your successful completion of this course.

Participation
Class participation is an essential part of class and includes: keeping up with reading, assignments, projects, contributing meaningfully to class discussions, active participation in group work, and coming to class regularly and on time.

Attendance
Faculty members may fail any student who is absent for a significant portion of class time. A significant portion of class time is defined as three absences for classes that meet once per week and four absences for classes that meet two or more times per week. During intensive summer sessions a significant portion of class time is defined as two absences. Lateness or early departure from class may also translate into one full absence.

Student Work Documentation
Students are required to submit digital copies of all semester work to their instructor before the end of the term. The specifications are set by the faculty member in accordance to the school policy.

Canvas
I rarely use this awkward ill made tool. If I do use it I will be very clear about its use and will let you know ahead of time. Use of Canvas may be an important resource for this class. Students should check it for announcements before coming to class each week. There is no need for you to waste your time poking around in it.

Delays
In rare instances, I may be delayed arriving to class.  If I have not arrived by the time class is scheduled to start, you must wait a minimum of thirty minutes for my arrival.  In the event that I will miss class entirely, a sign will be posted at the classroom indicating your assignment for the next class meeting.

Academic Integrity
This is the university’s Statement on Academic Integrity: “Plagiarism and cheating of any kind in the course of academic work will not be tolerated.  Academic honesty includes accurate use of quotations, as well as appropriate and explicit citation of sources in instances of paraphrasing and describing ideas, or reporting on research findings or any aspect of the work of others (including that of instructors and other students).  These standards of academic honesty and citation of sources apply to all forms of academic work (examinations, essays, theses, computer work, art and design work, oral presentations, and other projects).”

It is the responsibility of students to learn the procedures specific to their discipline for correctly and appropriately differentiating their own work from that of others.  Compromising your academic integrity may lead to serious consequences, including (but not limited to) one or more of the following: failure of the assignment, failure of the course, academic warning, disciplinary probation, suspension from the university, or dismissal from the university.

Every student at Parsons signs an Academic Integrity Statement as a part of the registration process.  Thus, you are held responsible for being familiar with, understanding, adhering to and upholding the spirit and standards of academic integrity as set forth by the Parsons Student Handbook.

Guidelines for Written Assignments
Plagiarism is the use of another person's words or ideas in any academic work using books, journals, internet postings, or other student papers without proper acknowledgment. For further information on proper acknowledgment and plagiarism, including expectations for paraphrasing source material and proper forms of citation in research and writing, students should consult the Chicago Manual of Style (cf. Turabian, 6th edition). The University Writing Center also provides useful on-line resources to help students understand and avoid plagiarism. See http://www.newschool.edu/admin/writingcenter/.
Students must receive prior permission from instructors to submit the same or substantially overlapping material for two different assignments.  Submission of the same work for two assignments without the prior permission of instructors is plagiarism.

Guidelines for Studio Assignments
Work from other visual sources may be imitated or incorporated into studio work if the fact of imitation or incorporation and the identity of the original source are properly acknowledged. There must be no intent to deceive; the work must make clear that it emulates or comments on the source as a source. Referencing a style or concept in otherwise original work does not constitute plagiarism. The originality of studio work that presents itself as “in the manner of” or as playing with “variations on” a particular source should be evaluated by the individual faculty member in the context of a critique. Incorporating ready-made materials into studio work as in a collage, synthesized photograph or paste-up is not plagiarism in the educational context. In the commercial world, however, such appropriation is prohibited by copyright laws and may result in legal consequences. DO NOT USE other people's creative output and call it your own in my classes!

Student Disability Services
In keeping with the University’s policy of providing equal access for students with disabilities, any student with a disability who needs academic accommodations is welcome to meet with me privately.  All conversations will be kept confidential.  Students requesting any accommodations will also need to meet with Jason Luchs in the office of Student Disability Services, who will conduct an intake, and if appropriate, provide an academic accommodation notification letter to you to bring to me.  At that point I will review the letter with you and discuss these accommodations in relation to this course.  Mr. Luchs’ office is located in 80 Fifth Avenue, Room 323 (3rd floor). His direct line is (212) 229-5626 x3135.  You may also access more information through the University’s web site at http://www.newschool.edu/studentservices/disability/.

Grading Standards [Taken from Parsons Handbook]
A [4.0; 96–100%]
Work of exceptional quality, which often goes beyond the stated goals of the course

A- [3.7; 91 –95%]
Work of very high quality

B+ [3.3; 86–90%]
Work of high quality that indicates substantially higher than average abilities

B [3.0; 81–85%]
Very good work that satisfies the goals of the course

B- [2.7; 76–80%]
Good work

C+ [2.3; 71–75%]
Above-average work

C [2.0; 66–70%]
Average work that indicates an understanding of the course material; passable
Satisfactory completion of a course is considered to be a grade of C or higher.

C- [1.7; 61–65%]
Passing work but below good academic standing

D [1.0; 46–60%]
Below-average work that indicates a student does not fully understand the assignments;
Probation level though passing for credit

F [0.0; 0–45%]
Failure, no credit

Grade of W
The grade of W may be issued by the Office of the Registrar to a student who officially withdraws from a course within the applicable deadline. There is no academic penalty, but the grade will appear on the student transcript. A grade of W may also be issued by an instructor to a graduate student (except at Parsons and Mannes) who has not completed course requirements nor arranged for an Incomplete.

Grade of Z
The grade of Z is issued by an instructor to a student who has not attended or not completed all required work in a course but did not officially withdraw before the withdrawal deadline. It differs from an “F,” which would indicate that the student technically completed requirements but that the level of work did not qualify for a passing grade.

Grades of Incomplete
The grade of I, or temporary incomplete, may be granted to a student under unusual and extenuating circumstances, such as when the student’s academic life is interrupted by a medical or personal emergency. This mark is not given automatically but only upon the student’s request and at the discretion of the instructor. A Request for Incomplete form must be completed and signed by student and instructor. The time allowed for completion of the work and removal of the “I” mark will be set by the instructor with the following limitations: [You should include one the following standards, depending on the level of your course].

Undergraduate students: Work must be completed no later than the seventh week of the following fall semester for spring or summer term incompletes and no later than the seventh week of the following spring semester for fall term incompletes. Grades of “I” not revised in the prescribed time will be recorded as a final grade of “WF” by the Office of the Registrar.

____________

Divisional, Program and Class Policies [You should include the following headings with the recommended text. In addition, you should include any other policies you may have.]

● Responsibility
Students are responsible for all assignments, even if they are absent. Late assignments, failure to complete the assignments for class discussion and/or critique, and lack of preparedness for in-class discussions, presentations and/or critiques will jeopardize your successful completion of this course.

● Participation
Class participation is an essential part of class and includes: keeping up with reading, assignments, projects, contributing meaningfully to class discussions, active participation in group work, and coming to class regularly and on time.

● Attendance
Parsons’ attendance guidelines were developed to encourage students’ success in all aspects of their academic programs. Full participation is essential to the successful completion of coursework and enhances the quality of the educational experience for all, particularly in courses where group work is integral; thus, Parsons promotes high levels of attendance. Students are expected to attend classes regularly and promptly and in compliance with the standards stated in the course syllabus.

While attendance is just one aspect of active participation, absence from a significant portion of class time may prevent the successful attainment of course objectives. A significant portion of class time is generally defined as the equivalent of three weeks, or 20%, of class time. Lateness or early departure from class may be recorded by the instructor as one full absence. Students may be asked to withdraw from a course if habitual absenteeism or tardiness has a negative impact on the class environment.
Members of the faculty are expected to provide syllabi in which course objectives and assessment criteria are described, in writing, at the beginning of the term. The syllabus should also articulate how attendance is assessed with respect to active participation.

At Parsons, attendance and lateness are assessed as of the first day of classes. Students who register after a class has begun are responsible for any missed assignments and coursework. Students who must miss a class session should notify the instructor and arrange to make up any missed work as soon as possible. A student who anticipates an extended absence should immediately inform the faculty and his or her program advisor. Advance approval for an extended absence is required to ensure successful completion of the course. Withdrawal from the course may be recommended if the proposed absence would compromise a student’s ability to meet course objectives.

Finally, faculty are asked to notify the student’s advisor for any student who misses two consecutive class sessions without explanation or who otherwise miss a significant portion of class time. Following two absences, students may be asked to speak with their advisor to review any impediments to their successful performance in class and, if so, to provide confirmation to the faculty member that such a conversation took place.

Religious Absences and Equivalent Opportunity
Pursuant to Section 224-a of the New York State Education Laws, any student who is absent from school because of his or her religious beliefs will be given an equivalent opportunity to register for classes or make up any examination, study, or work requirements which he or she may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. The student must inform the instructor at the beginning of the course of any anticipated absences due to religious observance.